Trex Birdhouse

Finished Trex Birdhouse_2015
Trex Birdhouse

I got tired of rebuilding pine birdhouses every few years as they rotted out and I also read that PT pine isn’t safe for the birds (not sure about that, but I will ere on the side of caution) so I investigated using Trex lumber. Usually reserved for decks, this material is weather and rot resistant and would seem to me to be an ideal material to build a bird house.

I selected a nice brown color Trex board. I was a bit worried about a darker color overheating the chicks inside, but I plan to hang this in relatively deep shade in a grove of big white pine trees. First step was to measure out the pieces. You can make two birdhouses from a single board. There is a plethora of websites that will explain the exact dimensions and size of the hole for attracting specific birds, so I won’t go into that. Since I am trying to attract Nuthatches, this particular birdhouse will have 8” sides, a 10” top (for some overhang rain protection) a 14” back (to make space for a hanging hole), and the floor is 4.5”.

Measuring the birdhouse sections
Measuring the birdhouse sections
Completed birdhouse pieces
Completed birdhouse pieces

After cutting all the boards, I next started to work on the entrance hole. Nuthatches like a hole exactly 1.25” in diameter and it should be about 6” from the floor. I carefully measured and centered before cutting. I selected a spade bit for the hole. Be prepared for the Trex board to cut in huge ribbons unlike wood.

Measuring/Centering entrance hole
Measuring/Centering entrance hole
Drilling entrance hole with a spade bit
Drilling Entrance Hole with a Spade Bit

I also opted for a copper “Predator Guard” as I a squirrel had completely chewed through my last Trex birdhouse that didn’t have this extra protection.  Lastly, I used a hot melt glue gun to make some baby bird “foot hold” the inside. I read somewhere that if it is too slippery the baby birds will not be able to climb out. I figure this will give them some needed traction. I know it seems like I know a lot about birds, but trust me I’m not who you should ask about bird cage covers or anything else bird related, I just really like wood bird houses.

Installing copper predator guard
Installing copper predator guard
Squirrel damage without a predator guard
Squirrel damage without a predator guard
Using hot melt glue to make some foot holds
Using hot melt glue to make some foot holds

I also drilled some drainage holes in the floor (important!).I predrilled all the holes and began assembly with 2.5” galvanized screws.

Drilling drainage holes
Drilling drainage holes
Pre-drilling assembly holes
Pre-drilling assembly holes
Partially assembled
Partially assembled

Net result was very good. I did get a family of Nuthatches to move in (seem to have a pair every year in this same spot) and the house has held up very well to the weather and squirrel attacks.

Complted Trex birdhouse
Complted Trex birdhouse

One thought on “Trex Birdhouse”

  1. Good looking bird house! I’ve just seen another crafting website which was full of metal (!?!?!?) bird houses made from old trophies and pots. A good example of putting aesthetics before requirements of the birds! Glad that you’ve used natural materials that won’t cook the birds!

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